PM Essence

Some Experiences during Training

 

By - Chakravarthy Rajagopalan

As a Software professional I have tried to conduct induction training sessions. These are some of the interesting experiences that I had.

 

Once I was walking a batch of fresh engineers through a software life cycle. One of the tasks was to develop n online test application. Halfway through the development of the application, one engineer came to me and said 'Sir, if we complete this application, we will feel very complacent and proud. Let us leave it unfinished'. I suppose this could be classified as 'negative thinking'. Some people who lack confidence probably shoot themselves in the foot to keep their motivation alive.

 

As part of the induction program we encouraged the team to make 'Proof-ofconcepts' for projects that we were bidding. This meant doing things which were unconventional and creative. At the end of the training the same engineer who wanted to leave the application incomplete found the POC projects to be fun and educational. I guess there are more conclusions we can draw about that person as well as what works in training and what does not.

 

One batch which sat through a 3 month induction program had already got jobs in another company. They had probably used our training period as a platform to hunt for jobs elsewhere, and got the best of both worlds (assuming that our world wasn't as good as the other).

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During one session of induction training, since the trainees knew that their jobs were assured and that much of the content of the induction program was academic they took it lightly and had to be disciplined like college students.

 

People only take training seriously if there are strings attached. There is usually one individual in a class who influences the team when they are offline. Identifying this individual and his attitude can be critical to the way the fresher team shapes up. If this 'ring leader' is creating a negative attitude about the training, and the company, the rest of the group may succumb to peer pressure.

 

We understand the shortcomings of the interview process when we see the hired hands during induction training. It is so difficult to understand a human being in 30 minutes of technical interview. But we see all the questions that we did not ask during the 30 days of interaction with the inductees. The quiet but well behaved

one, the quiet but radical one, the intelligent but wild one, the “I-me-mine” one, the “will I get a C++ project soon” one. 

 

Well I am sure people who tried to induct me felt as frustrated or elated at me and my peers once upon a time. What goes round comes around.